The “Euro Step” – Is it legal or a violation?

Watch this video of the Euro Step and you decide if this new technique is “within the prescribed limits” of movement or should be ruled a traveling violation.

In order to rule “traveling” correctly, three questions must be addressed:

  • Which foot is the pivot foot?
  • How much legal movement may the player initiate (after ending their dribble)?
  • How much movement would be considered “in excess” of prescribed limits? 

Keep in mind, it is not possible for a player to “travel” while dribbling.  Of course there could be other violations such as palming or illegal dribble – but not traveling.

When watching the “Euro Step” video note where the dribbler  was relative to a position on the floor when he ended the dribble.

  • If a player ends a dribble with both feet on the floor, either foot may become the pivot.
  • If both feet were off the floor and that player lands on both feet simultaneously, either foot may become the pivot foot. 
  • Once one foot is moved, the other becomes the pivot foot.  That is not the case in the Euro Step.
  • If both feet were off the floor and that player lands on one foot followed by the other, the first foot to touch the floor would become the pivot foot.
  • If one foot is on the floor when that player gains control or ends a dribble, two legal means of coming to a stop are possible.  He may bring his other foot to the floor and thereby stop, or momentum may cause him to jump off that foot which is already on the floor and land on both feet simultaneously.  This is a legal jump stop.

Once the pivot foot is established … it may be LIFTED but NOT RETURNED to the floor before the ball is released for a pass or try for goal.

When breaking down the video watch for these key items:

  1. Did the dribble end with one or both feet on the floor?
  2. Which foot should be considered the pivot foot?
  3. Did the pivot foot touch the floor again – BEFORE the ball was released for the try?

If the answer to number three (above) was YES, then this Euro Step would be considered illegal.

If the ball was released then player stayed within the “prescribed limits” of movement and would be considered legal.

Worth mentioning is the action of the hand in the cross over movement while dribbling.  Did you consider this illegal “palming” of the ball during the dribble?

The move would be considered illegal if:

  • The ball comes to rest in the dribbler’s hand(s)
  • With the palm facing UPWARD — i.e. “more than a handshake.”
  • The player continues the dribble after the above.

As player become quicker and more skilled there will be coaches that teach moves outside the prescribed limits of movement to test our knowledge and recognition of the dribble and travel rules.  By knowing the pivot foot limitations will be the first step in understanding the limitations of a dribbler when it comes to new moves like the Euro Step.

Give our “60 Seconds on Officiating” community YOUR opinion (below) on the legality of the Euro Step.

 

About Billy Martin

Co-creator of "60 Seconds on Officiating" and co-author of Beyond the Rules (book series) for Basketball Officials. Billy is a 35+ year basketball official with IAABO (Camden Board 34 and Cum-Cape 196, in Southern NJ). He also is a collegiate softball umpire with the Eastern Collegiate Softball Umpires (ECSU), and created the best selling "Bluebook 60" for fastpitch umpires, and coaches. Contact: Website | Twitter | More Posts

83 Comments on The “Euro Step” – Is it legal or a violation?

  1. It s a travel. The left foot is the pivot foot and he moves it, steps with it, then shoots the ball. Clearly a travel.

  2. Disagree, Jim. Left foot is pivot, but he legally lifts it and then shoots the ball before pivot foot returns to the floor. This is legal.

    • Smh, think about what you’re saying- he lifts it Legally, yes, except that THEN his right foot hits the floor as well, Before he shoots it. You make it sound as if as long as he shoots it before his pivot foot hits the floor again, he can do Anything in between. He can’t THEN take another step with his right foot. His pivot foot can only leave the floor to go up in the air, as he releases the ball, before EITHER foot touches the floor again. The eurostep is just a nice term for running illegally on purpose…and the refs ignoring it…

      • Sorry, Ryan that’s incorrect. A lot of people think this and they get angry and try to call traveling. However, the rule is very clear. The pivot foot may be picked up when shooting or passing but cannot be returned to the floor before the shot or pass occurs. He ended his dribble with his left foot on the ground making his left foot his pivot foot, then he took the step to the right with his right foot not returning his pivot foot to the floor. If what you are saying is true then the running layup would be illegal. I’ve coached middle school basketball for over 10 years and I’ve attended seminars, read books and watch countless videos on this by experts.

  3. Though our state seems to be about three or four years behind anything new, this happened three times in the last two games. Incurred the protest of the opposing coaches and about 50% of the assembled fans, but, as video confirmed, nothing illegal about it. As per the dictum, “Just because it looks bad doesn’t mean it’s illegal.” It’s quite another thing convincing others not to call it a violation. When they do, nobody really seems to protest, solely because it “looked bad.”

    • You just watched the video Confirm that it is illegal and so densely said anyway “as the video confirmed, nothing illegal about it”. MANU told you he didn’t think it was illegal. The video didn’t Confirm there was nothing illegal. It confirmed MANU does an Illegal move on purpose.

    • Here’s what you’re missing. Once the pivot foot is established, without an intervening fumble and touch by an opposing player or other loss of possession, your other foot cannot become the pivot foot. Once the pivot foot always the pivot foot. That’s why your other foot can’t become the pivot foot as you go hopping down the court as you describe below. The real problem, however, is that upon picking up your dribble, the first foot to hit the floor after that does not automatically become a pivot foot. It only does if you stop without taking a second step. In picking up your dribble you are allowed a two count rhythm and if you use it, the second footfall becomes the pivot foot. So in the Euro step the player picks up his dribble lunging one way planting in the first rhythm say the right foot, then lunges across his body to his left foot. As the second foot fall that becomes his pivot foot. He then jumps and releases the ball before either foot returns to the floor. No travel. Here’s the official explanation:

      b. A player who receives the ball while he is progressing or upon completion of a dribble, may use a two-count rhythm in coming to a stop, passing or shooting the ball.
      The first count occurs:
      (1) As he receives the ball, if either foot is touching the floor at the time he receives it.
      (2) As the foot touches the floor, or as both feet touch the floor simultane- ously after he receives the ball, if both feet are off the floor when he receives it.
      The second occurs:
      (1) After the count of one when either foot touches the floor, or both feet touch the floor simultaneously.
      c. A player who comes to a stop on the count of one may pivot, using either foot as the pivot foot.
      d. A player who comes to a stop on the count of two, with one foot in advance of the other, may pivot using only the rear foot as the pivot foot.
      e. A player who comes to a stop on the count of two, with neither foot in advance of the other, may use either foot as the pivot foot.

  4. Agree with Matt. Left is pivot, he releases ball before left returns to floor.

    • You didn’t just watch him then plant his right foot into the floor after picking up his pivot foot? So his right foot was his pivot foot 3 steps before that too. Since you seem to think you can do anything after calling it your pivot foot, why does it matter Which pivot foot you’re referring too? You just ignoring that he then made his right foot his Last pivot foot, and talked about his left one before that. I saw 3 or 4 people say that after WATCHING it in slow motion! Read the rules! You can’t just pick up your pivot foot and let your other foot touch the floor since it hasn’t touched yet lol wtf! NEITHER foot can touch once your pivot foot leaves. I can’t believe something so obvious is being said wrong by so many idiots! You just watched it blatantly go against the rulebook!

  5. rmfc78@windstream.net' Rick McKernan // December 28, 2013 at 12:43 pm // Reply

    legal the ball is gone before the pivot foot returns to the floor.It is just a good move.

    • No its not! You’d have be so stupid to think its legal! If you were to just stop, period. Lift your right foot up, jump with your left(since its your pivot), then you Have to get rid of the ball before EITHER foot hits the ground! So why would you think he can just take another step with his right because his left didn’t touch again? How stupid is that? That’s the definition of traveling so that players don’t do it! So they don’t do That!

      • Actually, you can do that. If I come to the floor and stop establishing a pivot foot then I can use that pivot foot to launch myself into a step or jump in either direction. Manu could have stopped establishing his left as his pivot foot, done about 6 jab steps with his right foot keeping his left pivot foot on the ground, then launched himself to the right landing on his right foot, then shooting. As long as his pivot foot doesn’t come to the floor, it’s legal. I’m sorry that you don’t like the rule, but you are wrong.

  6. Legal move. Left foot is the pivot; he lifts it and jumps off the right foot. Looks funny because we aren’t used to seeing it, but nothing illegal that I can see.

    • Exactly he lifts it and jumps off his right foot, which is why it’s ILLEGAL. By your logic, he could stop, jump off his left foot, and then just keep hopping all over the court on his right foot just as long as he wants, cause his pivot foot didn’t land….that’s how ridiculous it is…back IN REALITY, so that that can’t happen, the real rule is that NEITHER foot can touch again once his pivot foot leaves the floor. He had to get rid of it before his right foot touches.

      • Actually, Ryan no one has said that. If he started hopping then he taken more than 2 steps (1 1/2 for purists) However, he didn’t hop. He took one step to the right after establishing a pivot foot. Completely legal.

  7. topbartender@sbcglobal.net' Redmond Hayes // December 28, 2013 at 1:59 pm // Reply

    This is a good move. You can see that the left foot is the pivot foot and does not return to the floor. This move is performed by highly skilled players.

  8. If you pause the video at the 1:05 mark, it shows that the dribble has ended as he is holding the ball above his left knee. At that point (if you are able to pause the video right as it turns to 1:05), his right foot is on the ground and left foot is in the air. By rule his right foot is pivot. He then comes down on the left, then steps and comes down with the right (pivot foot) before releasing the ball. I make the argument for a travel violation.

  9. haraburdab@gmail.com' Brian Haraburda // December 28, 2013 at 2:08 pm // Reply

    Looks a lot like a step through that had been modified to look a little bit different. This is legal.

  10. This is the easiest no call ever. No even close to a travel.

  11. Look at the video. Both hands are on the ball. Dribble has ended. Left foot is NOT on the floor. Close but NOT on the floor. Right foot is the pivot foot. Steps with left. By rule, ball MUST be released before the pivot foot, right foot, comes to the floor again. Steps with the right and it hits the floor and then the shot goes up. Traveling violation.

  12. If you watch when he splits the double team he pushes the ball left and carries the ball before he makes his move to the basket so I would call that violation first.

  13. Seeing this move more frequently, nothing illegal about this move here in the video. Non-professional players will carry the ball more often when making this move or the defense will foul. Looks weird, like jumping off your right foot for a right-handed lay-up. Weird does not make it illegal.

  14. Regardless of how you rule on it..in a game, we have to make split decisions and cannot rewind, rethink, pause and/or debate it. Looks legal to me without a rewind and pause but what’s more important is that we have this clip to prepare us to anticipate these moves and be prepared to make a ruling on its legality. These videos make impressions in mind and I replay them in my mind during pregame warmups as I observe player tendencies. Thank you 60 seconds; keep up the great work.

  15. Not a travel.
    Think of this just like the hop through and up to the basket.
    We should not be calling these travels.
    This is the new direction of the game and most of the new athletic players have these moves.

    • YOU think about it in the Right terms, and stop misleading people. The rule is so simple its almost impossible to misinterpret as you have! Once he stops dribbling and his left foot becomes the pivot foot, NEITHER foot can touch the floor again once it leaves the floor. “The pivot foot not hitting the floor again” has nothing to do with anything. NEITHER foot can touch again.

      • You must be new to the sport. That’s ok. Everyone has to start somewhere. What rule are you talking about? If you end your dribble with one foot on the ground and then you jump onto two feet that is a traditional jump stop and neither foot is the pivot foot. However, you are talking about a pivot foot. If one is established then the player can lift it and take a step as long as it doesn’t come in contact with the floor before the ball is released then it’s legal.

  16. Clean move. Looks awkward but because it is not a most often seen straight forward move to the basket does not make it a violation

  17. It could be legal or illegal (depends of how it is executed) but anyway I don’t like it.

  18. It appears that we are trying to compare apples and oranges, NBA rules allow two steps whereas high school and college allow one. Clearly the euro step is a two step move. It is a travel all day long!!!

  19. A couple have mentioned the 1:05 mark on the film, regarding the status of the ball and the Right pivot foot…. Making a call… ” If you cant see it at full speed, it isn’t there”.
    The dribble ended when the ball was gathered, at that time the Left foot was the pivot.

    this is a ‘Post Pivot move’ on the run, enjoy it, dont guess watch tape, get FAST EYES. IF your good in the post, you’ll know walk when flys by you in the “C”

    • show where “gathering the ball” is defined in the nfhs rule book. “end of dribble” is well defined and it happens with the right foot on the floor… therefore it is the pivot.

  20. Agree with Matt. Legal move. Pivot foot never retouched the floor.

  21. the LEFT foot is the pivot foot when he gathers the ball. watch it again.

    • it is not about “gather” which is undefined, but rather “end of dribble” which is well-defined as two hands on the ball. this happens with the #right# foot on the floor and it is a traveling violation.

  22. This is no doubt a travel. The right foot is the pivot foot. Therefore, once the right foot returns to the floor the player has traveled. Do not think of this as a legal move as ever definition of the euro step is described as a two step process. Which in high school sports two steps is a travel. How does anyone think that this is a legal move.

  23. allow the move for those with skill set to pull it off, eliminate the guess work of the officials, solidify , unify ,and simplify the action . coaches will adjust could improve players game

  24. kind of scares me, the amount of people who think this is a travel. Remember When breaking down the video watch for these key items:

    Did the dribble end with one or both feet on the floor?

    “The dribble doesnt end until he is making a legal layup.”

    Which foot should be considered the pivot foot?
    “there are no Pivots, as the dribble NEVER ENDED.”

    Did the pivot foot touch the floor again – BEFORE the ball was released for the try? N/A

    • this is simply not true. the dribble ends when both hands are on the ball… this also marks the beginning of the shot.

  25. Disagree Chandra. The dribble ends when the dribbler catches or causes the ball to come to rest in one or both hands. In several of these video “takes” the dribble ended when the player had a foot on the ground (the pivot foot) and he then steps to the opposite foot and back to the pivot before releasing the ball on the try. Each video “take” was different; some being “traveling” in my view and others not so.

  26. This is a walk. The left foot is the pivot foot. He can lift it to shoot but he must release the ball before the pivot foot comes back down to the floor. He lifts his left pivot foot, steps onto his right foot and lifts his left pivot foot. So far , so good. But then he returns to the floor with his left foot. The pivot foot may not return to the floor before the ball is released. That’s a walk and we are going the other way.

  27. In the NBA two steps to the basket is allow, I don’t know if it is the rule,but it is not called. In College and High School, the “Euro Step” would not be allowed, that would be “Traveling”

  28. At game speed you cannot stop the tape to review, Therefore, if you are going to call a travel it should be an obvious call. A player is allowed two steps after discontinuing a dribble regardless of how long, awkward, or direction those two steps take the player. If there is no carry/palming violation, or third step, you play on unless there’s a clear-cut third step or shuffle.

    • yes. it should be obvious. in full speed this might not be #recognized# as a travel, but that does not mean that it is not a travel… it is.

  29. If done correctly as Manu demonstrated, it is legal. Great move.

  30. Legal in NBA, traveling in high school

  31. The biggest question that must be answered is when was the ball gathered, thus resulting in the end of the dribble. It is apparent that this is causing a lot of problems for officials. It shows in the differing opinion as to which is the pivot foot? The left or the right. In order to properly rule on this play you must get the pivot foot correct. In this video he gathers the ball with his left foot on the floor making it the pivot foot. He then steps with his right foot and releases the shot before returning the left foot to the floor (note Manu is also a lefthander and shooting a layup off the right foot is natural for him). A legal move.

  32. It is very obvious that we as officials are not consistent! Someone please give us a rule interpretation! Just a thought

  33. Legal move. Both feet on the floor when dribble ends, therefore either foot may be established as pivot. He picks up right foot first establishing left as pivot, steps of right, lifts left but releases ball before left returns to floor.

  34. By technical definition, the footwork of a “lay-up” is traveling (L-R-L) for a right-hander. Pick up the ball on the first L, then a R, then a L. If the player then passed the ball, it would be a travel…but we allow him/her to make those fluid steps into a shot. Watch the video closely, it is EXACTLY a left-handed lay-up (R-L-R). Spelled out: dribbles and picks up the ball on the first R, then steps L, then the R step, up and shoot. The ONLY very slight variance is that it is not in a straight line. The move from the L to the R is LATERAL!. For some reason everyone is having a tough time recognizing! This is a left-handed lay-up!! If he passed the ball, it is a travel. He is allowed to shoot the ball.

    • a layup does not have to be l-r-l or r-l-r… in fact both of those, as you describe them, are illegal in high school basketball. if he “picks up” the ball with both hands with his right foot down THAT is his pivot foot. if he picks it up, he MUST shoot or pass. in the nba? legal apparently as there are two steps allowed after the end of dribble.

  35. Great move. Anyone calling travel is too technical and jealous. Move was first seen in NBA by Latrell Sprewell and Alen Iverson, not Manu Ginobli. Get your game up and your history. Analysis to paralysis is always detrimental to the game. Love the sport. Don’t hate congratulate.

  36. I disagree with Rob as to “we allow the L-R-L”…The perfect non travel lay up is that the left foot should not be on the ground when the ball is gathered…the player should be between steps, (in the air) gather the ball, put the right foot on the floor (pivot) THEN step with the left foot (one step) and up…Two steps is illegal by the rules. I am not aware of anywhere in the in the rule book where it says they can take two steps when they take a lay up. Certainly, there are not two separate rules for passing and shooting.
    As far as the video goes, it does appear to me that his left foot is the pivot foot, and if thats the case…NO TRAVEL…Just my two cents.

    • Bob, I agree with you by far the most out of these comments. It’s our definition of “step” that’s throwing us off. Those that say two “steps” is a travel are correct! However, the first foot that comes down (in your first example, the right foot) is the pivot, then a “step” comes, and then you’re up, and shoot. If you gather in the air, establish a pivot, step, jump and pass – still legal. It all depends on when you gather the ball – if gathered too soon, it is a travel.

  37. Travel – Dribble ended with right foot on floor. When it comes down again during the layup…travel.

  38. Watch video closely. This is multiple takes. I believe he travels in one and legal in others. Watch foot position in lane and defenders. I believe everyone is right because there was a legal move and illegal move.

  39. kfarnal@live.com' Keving Farnal // April 21, 2014 at 11:04 pm // Reply

    The first time through at 1:05 he establishes his pivot foot as his right foot. Then he steps with his left and then again with his right. That’s a travel at any level except the NBA. The NBA made a slight modification to their rules in 2009 that make this legal. In the NBA, the first step occurs “after he’s gained control of the ball”. He doesn’t maintain control until after he’s grasped it with both hands. This occurs just after the right step at 1:05. So his first step is with his left foot. So his left foot is now his pivot foot in the NBA.

  40. How is this different from a standard lay-up? It’s simply a change in direction during the two steps.

  41. The difficulty to me is determining when did the dribble stop. You could make the argument that it stopped when his right foot was still on the floor (establishing the pivot foot) or it stopped just after the right foot left the floor (establishing the left foot as the pivot foot). So in this case since to me it is too close to call, I follow the ‘if you THINK it is a travel, take a pass. If you KNOW it is a travel, call it.” I go with it is legal only because it is too close to call.

  42. This has nothing to do with 1-step allowed or 2-steps allowed, it’s a standard layup with a change of direction. As with any layup, it’s possible to travel if you’re sloppy with your ball-handling and pick up your dribble too early or too late. But otherwise this move is not hard to execute legally just like any other layup (you do need more body control to pull off the change of direction successfully.)

  43. Shouldn’t you have to actually, you know, PIVOT with your pivot foot? All he’s doing is picking up the ball and walking around with it. This move should have never been allowed..

  44. I mean, I’m going to pick up the ball, take two steps in whatever direction I feel like — and at whatever speed — and it’s apparently legal as can be.

  45. The other thing to pay attention to is how fast the player executes this move. When Manu is demonstrating, he’s not necessarily playing at “game speed”. This can change the moment when the ball is gathered, and usually when it’s done very slowly, the gather point happens “earlier” in the step sequence. For a right handed layup, a very slow “demonstration” would put the gathering motion while the left foot is still on the ground, making it the pivot foot. Then you step right, and back to left to go up and shoot, and you’ve travelled. At game speed, the gather happens “between steps”, just after the left foot has come up off the floor, so that the right foot becomes the pivot. Then you step left and go up to shoot and everything’s fine. Manu’s shooting a left handed layup here, so it’s the opposite feet, but the same idea applies: when you slow it down enough, it *becomes* a travel because the gather happens a half step too soon. We can slow our steps down to demonstrate a layup, but we can’t slow gravity down to make the ball hang in the air a bit longer before we gather it.

  46. whatzjie@yahoo.com' Ü FEEL GOOD // January 25, 2016 at 1:41 am // Reply

    1-2 step. Not travel.

  47. I went over and over this video and the best I can tell his right foot is on the floor when he has gathered the ball in. When his right foot hits the floor again without releasing the ball it is a travel.

  48. It is extremely difficult to determine if Manu picks up (gathers) the ball with one or 2 feet on the ground. For the setup of the move to occur legally, 2 feet have to be on the ground. Assuming this happens (and he has his right toe and left heel on the ground it seems), then, the left foot becomes the pivot foot which then is lifted and never put back down. Manu still is allowed to land and use his right foot to elevate himself to the basket since he does not return his pivot foot to the ground. This move truly skirts through the traveling violation loopholes, just as the player skirts around the defender.

  49. this discussion is full of non-rule based terms and arguments. there is no such term as “gather” or “step” defined in the nfhs basketball rule book. there #are# terms such as “dribble” and “pivot” defined however… and the traveling violation is based on these definitions.

    a “dribble” ends when a player touches the ball with both hands. the “pivot” foot is the one on the ground when the dribble ends. the “pivot” foot cannot leave the ground and return before the dribbler passes or shoots. end of story.

    you may judge that, in the video, the “dribble” does not end (two hands on the ball!) until his left foot is down. if this is your judgment, then his left foot is the “pivot” and it’s not traveling.
    in my judgment, he has both hands on the ball with his right foot down, so it is a violation.

  50. How is the Euro step not considered a jump, like in the pro hop or hop step? The last jump is not a natural movement like in a regular layup. And since it’s not a legal hop, then it’s a travel.

  51. Wow…a lot weighed in on this one. Clearly the pivot foot is what determines whether this move is legal or not. From my prospective, the dribble ended just prior to the left foot contacting the floor. The left foot is the pivot foot. As he steps through with his right foot, the left pivot foot never contacted the floor until the ball was released. This by rule, is a legal play.

  52. Here’s the explanation. Once the pivot foot is established, without an intervening fumble and touch by an opposing player or other loss of possession, your other foot cannot become the pivot foot. Once the pivot foot always the pivot foot. That’s why your other foot can’t become the pivot foot as you go hopping down the court as someone suggested above. The real problem, however, is that upon picking up your dribble, the first foot to hit the floor after that does not automatically become a pivot foot. It only does if you stop without taking a second step. In picking up your dribble you are allowed a two count rhythm and if you use it, the second footfall becomes the pivot foot. So in the Euro step the player picks up his dribble lunging one way planting in the first rhythm say the right foot, then lunges across his body to his left foot. As the second foot fall that becomes his pivot foot. He then jumps and releases the ball before either foot returns to the floor. No travel. Here’s the official explanation:

    b. A player who receives the ball while he is progressing or upon completion of a dribble, may use a two-count rhythm in coming to a stop, passing or shooting the ball.
    The first count occurs:
    (1) As he receives the ball, if either foot is touching the floor at the time he receives it.
    (2) As the foot touches the floor, or as both feet touch the floor simultane- ously after he receives the ball, if both feet are off the floor when he receives it.
    The second occurs:
    (1) After the count of one when either foot touches the floor, or both feet touch the floor simultaneously.
    c. A player who comes to a stop on the count of one may pivot, using either foot as the pivot foot.
    d. A player who comes to a stop on the count of two, with one foot in advance of the other, may pivot using only the rear foot as the pivot foot.
    e. A player who comes to a stop on the count of two, with neither foot in advance of the other, may use either foot as the pivot foot.

  53. about the euro step in general, as a player who does this move regularly: it’s just a layup where your two steps are taken in opposite directions instead of all in the same line. nothing more. legal.

    • jimbadil@gmail.com' James Williams // October 9, 2016 at 9:06 pm // Reply

      James, you may get away with it, but it is clearly traveling. The difference between the regular layup and the eurostep is that you pick up the ball thereby establishing the pivot. In a regular layup the transition from dribbling to shooting is a continuous motion. The problem with the play is that too many officials who are new and don’t know the traveling rule well enough let it go so there is not sufficient consistency.

    • jimbadil@gmail.com' James Williams // October 9, 2016 at 9:07 pm // Reply

      Also, you are not allowed 2 steps on a layup.

  54. jimbadil@gmail.com' James Williams // October 9, 2016 at 9:02 pm // Reply

    As a 30 year official I maintain that it is clearly traveling. In the video, he picks up the ball when his right foot is in contact with the floor then lifts the left, puts it down and picks up the right and puts it down, jumping off of it to shoot. “Traveling”

  55. jamesrruk@yahoo.co.uk' JR in Europe // February 6, 2017 at 5:28 pm // Reply

    If he had timed his gather after the dribble correctly, he would have gathered as the left foot is on the floor, thus either establishing it as the pivot (if it is the only foot on the floor) or allowing it to become the pivot (if the right is also on the floor at that point, then lifted to make the left the pivot). In that case the move would be legal.

    However, if you slow the video enough you can see that he finishes his dribble with the right foot only in contact with the floor, thus establishing a pivot earlier than he intended, i.e. the right foot is the pivot. The only further step allowed at that point is to place the left foot, from which he may now spring for a shot. The pivot (right foot) must not return to the floor before the ball has been played. He, however, does return the right foot to the floor, making it a travel.

    That is everywhere except the NBA. In the NBA this is explicitly OK since the rule change and has been implicitly allowed for a while.

    Unless the “Euro-step” is defined as taking two full steps, it is not necessarily illegal in itself. As stated above, if he had only taken care to gather his dribble with the left foot, both feet, or neither foot, in contact with the floor, he would be OK – left foot pivot, jump off the right, left pivot foot does not return to floor before shot or pass is launched. As it is he gathered a shade early and ended up travelling.

  56. Right foot is the pivot foot. Therefore this was a travel. This was very close making it a tough call, but most of the times I have seen this move in high school or college games it has obviously been a travel. The simple rule is you don’t get 2 steps.

  57. If this happened in the middle of the floor and “Player A” was on a fastbreak and a defender “Player B” somehow ended up on the ground in front of him and “Player A” stopped mid dribble launching off his left foot to jump over “Player B” landing on his right foot and then lunged forward of his right then passing and/or shooting the ball it would be called a traveling violation every time

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